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Filing an Application

Ready to file a new application? Click here after reading the information below

 

User Guide

The CAT has developed a guide to help applicants file their applications through the CAT-ODR system.

  • Access the CAT’s Filing an Application Guide here: [WORD] [PDF]

 

Have a Question?

If you have a question about any of the information you’ve read, please contact us. We have a team available to answer any questions you may have.

Filing an Application

Steps to File an Application

Step 1. Start your Application Online

First, you must create a new CAO account or log in to an existing CAO account.

Click here to start the application process.

Once you’ve clicked the button above, simply select your application type from the drop down and then click the File an Application button. You will then be taken to an interactive checklist developed by the CAT to help Applicants file their applications.

 

Step 2. Identify the Applicant(s)

Next, you will be asked to identify the Applicant(s). An Applicant is the party that files the application. Owners, mortgagees and condo corporations can be applicants.

If you are filing for yourself, then you are the Applicant. If you are filing on behalf of someone else (e.g., if you are filing as the Applicant’s lawyer or a paralegal), then the entity you represent is the Applicant.

If you are filing an application about a provision in your condo corporation’s governing documents, you can file by yourself or jointly with other applicants.

If you are considering filing an application with two or more Applicants, make sure that the other Applicants are willing to be a part of this application before you add them. You should only file an application along with other Applicants if it is about the same issues. If another Applicant wants to raise different issues, then they may want to consider filing their own application separately.

 

Step 3. Identify the Respondent(s)

Next, you will be asked to identify who you are filing the application against – this entity is known as the Respondent. Who you can identify as a Respondent depends on the type of application you are filing.

If you are filing an application about your condo corporation’s records…

  • Your condo corporation will typically be the Respondent.

If you are filing an application about a provision in your condo corporation’s governing documents relating to pets and animals, parking and storage, vehicles, or indemnification (e.g., chargebacks)…

If you are filing an application about non-compliance with a Settlement Agreement…

  • The parties to the Settlement Agreement that have not complied with it are the Respondents. If more than one parties have failed to comply, you can identify multiple Respondents.

The CAT cannot accept applications filed against a condo manager a condo management services provider.

 

Step 4. Identify the Intervenor(s)

If you are filing an application about a provision in your condo corporation’s governing documents relating to pets and animals, parking and storage, vehicles, or indemnification (e.g., chargebacks), you must identify all Intervenors when you file.

For more information on who you must identify, you should review the CAT’s Guide to Respondents and Intervenors: Governing Documents Disputes.

 

Step 5. Describe the problem

You will then be asked to describe problem. The CAT-ODR system will first ask you to identify your issues from a list, and to provide additional details. This information will be shared with the CAT and all other parties.

You do not need to describe everything that was said and done before you filed the application. Instead, focus on the important details, so the CAT and the other Users know what the application is about.

 

Step 6. Add Documents (Optional)

During this step, you can add any documents or files that you think may be useful to refer to in your case. The other Users will be able to view and download these files once they have joined the case.

While this step is optional, you may want to upload a copy of any documents that are relevant to your case.

If you are filing an application about your condo corporation’s records…

  • You should add a copy of your Request for Records (if you have a copy) and any responses you’ve received.

If you are filing an application about a provision in your condo corporation’s governing documents relating to pets and animals, parking and storage, vehicles, or indemnification (e.g., chargebacks)…

  • You should add a copy of the condo corporation’s governing documents (i.e., the declaration, by-laws and rules).

You will have another opportunity to upload documents again once the CAT accepts your application.

 

Step 7. Submit your Application

Finally, you will be asked to confirm the information you entered in Steps 1 to 6. If you notice an error, you can go back to any of the earlier steps and correct it.

If you are filing an application with two or more Applicants, each applicant must join the application and must vote to file it before it can be filed with the CAT. Once everyone has voted in favour of filing, the Primary Applicant (i.e., the Applicant who started the application) can file the application.

There is a non-refundable $25.00 filing fee to file an application with the CAT.

After you file your application, the CAT will review it.

  • If your application looks like it includes all the necessary information, we will accept the application and you will be prompted to deliver the Notice to the other Users.
  • If the CAT needs more information about your application, we may ask you for more details.

Filing an Application

FAQ

Condo unit owners, mortgagees, and condominium corporations can file an application with the CAT. Some case types may have more specific requirements for who may file a case.
Applicants can file applications about:

  • Records issues
  • Provisions in a condo corporation’s governing documents that deal with:
    • Pets and animals
    • Parking and storage
    • Vehicles
    • Indemnification (e.g., chargebacks) related to the above topics.
  • Issues with compliance with a Settlement Agreement reached in an earlier CAT case.

This is because of s. 1.36 of the Condominium Act, 1998, which only allows the CAT to deal with disputes that described in regulations under the Act.

There is a non-refundable $25.00 filing fee to file an application with the CAT.
CAT staff will review your application to make sure it contains all the necessary information.

If the CAT has questions about your application, they may ask you for more information. Otherwise, CAT staff will accept the application.

Either way, you will receive an email notification on the next steps (usually within a few business days).

Yes, you can have a lawyer or paralegal, or other person file your application for you. This person is called a representative. Companies, organizations and condo corporations must use a representative to file a case.

If your representative is receiving a fee to file for you, they must be a lawyer or paralegal licensed by the Law Society of Ontario (LSO) or must fall under an exemption in the Law Society Act or the LSO’s by-laws.

If you are an individual condo unit owner or occupant (i.e., not a company), you do not need to have a representative.

However, entities like companies and condo corporations must be represented by either:

  • A member of the condo corporations board of directors
  • The condo corporation’s manager, or
  • A lawyer or paralegal licensed by the LSO.
If you are filing an application about a provision in your condo corporation’s governing documents, you can file either by yourself or jointly with other applicants.

If you are considering filing an application with two or more Applicants, make sure that the other Applicants are willing to be a part of this application before you add them. You should only file an application along with other Applicants if it is about the same issues. If another Applicant wants to raise different issues, then they may want to consider filing their own application separately.

If you are filing an application about a provision in your condo corporation’s governing documents, you can file against multiple Respondents.

For more information on who you can name as a Respondent, you should review the CAT’s Guide to Respondents and Intervenors: Governing Documents Disputes.