Skip to Main Content

Solutions for Owners

Meetings

Examples include:

  • The board refused to add a topic of concern or interest to the AGM agenda.
  • The board did not allow enough discussion on a by-law during the meeting before being asked to vote.
  • The conduct of the board members at the meeting was disrespectful and impolite, resulting in owners feeling they had been treated poorly or not heard.

1. Understand your rights and obligations

You can learn more about what the Condo Act says, and the role your condo corporation’s governing documents by visiting Step #2 – Legal Considerations. Once you have reviewed this information, proceed to #2 below.

2. Contact your Condo Board

If you believe that the meeting issue is being caused by an action or decision of the condo board (or condo manager, if your condo corporation has one) you may want to speak to your condo board (i.e. the condo corporation) first. They may not know that there is a meeting-related issue or concern, so speaking to them may resolve the issue quickly.

If you don’t feel comfortable speaking to them in person, or if you’ve spoken to them already and the issue has not been resolved, you may want to send a letter. You can use our First Letter template, which you can find in the Helpful Resources section at the bottom of this page.

You should keep track of the issues you’ve been experiencing with as much detail as possible. This will help those you contact understand the issues, and what’s causing the problem. It may be helpful to keep track of:

  • The date(s) and time(s) that the meeting issue occured;
  • The type of meeting issue you experienced (e.g. not having an opportunity to speak before voting, issue with how the meetings are conducted, etc.);
  • The response you received when the issue was raised prior, during or after the meeting.

As noted in Step 2, if your condo corporation’s governing documents deal with meeting issues, your condo corporation has a legal obligation to ensure that everyone complies with them.

Note: If you are sending a copy of the letter to other owners (e.g. individuals who may have the same concern), an easy way for you to do this is to send it by mail to the address listed in the corporation’s record of owners and mortgagees. Under section 46.1 of the Condo Act, all condo corporations are required to maintain this record.

Don’t have a copy of these records?

Owners can request a copy from your condo corporation using the mandatory Request for Records form, available on our website.

You should keep a copy of your letter/email and note the date and time that you sent it.

If your issue isn’t resolved after contacting the condo corporation, proceed to #3 below.

3. Follow up

After you’ve contacted your condo board (the condo corporation), they should take steps to resolve your issue.

If you’ve given them a reasonable opportunity but the issue has not been resolved, you can send a follow-up letter or email. You can use our Second Letter template, which you can find under the Helpful Resources section at the bottom of this page.

You should keep a copy of your letter/email and note the date and time that you sent it.

What if these steps don’t resolve my issue?

If you’ve tried the steps above and your issue still hasn’t been resolved, there are further steps you can take, including private mediation, arbitration, and other legal actions.

Visit Step #4 – Additional Help for more information.

Before proceeding to Step #4, you may wish to reach out directly to the board. Explain the steps you have taken, request that the board take action, and note that you are considering further action if the board doesn’t address the issue. You can use our Third Letter template which you can find under the Helpful Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Have a Question?

If you have a question about any of the information you’ve read, please contact us. We have a team available to answer any questions you may have.
1. Understand your rights and obligations

You can learn more about what the Condo Act says and the role your condo corporation’s governing documents play by visiting Step #2 – Legal Considerations.

Ensure that you have followed the process for an owner-requisitioned meeting that is required under section 46 of the Condo Act. You can find a helpful overview of the process on our website.

Once you have reviewed this information, proceed to #2 below.

2. Contact your Condo Board

Speak to a board member(s) and confirm whether they have received or aware of the requisition. The requisition should have been delivered personally or by registered mail to the corporation’s president or secretary, or delivered to the corporation’s address for service. It could be that they are not aware of the requisition.

If you don’t feel comfortable speaking to them in person, or if you’ve spoken to them already and the issue has not been resolved, you may want to send a letter. You can use our First Letter template, which you can find in the Helpful Resources section at the bottom of this page.

In this letter, you may wish to direct them to section 46 (4) of the Condo Act, which sets out the duty of the board when it receives a requisition.

The board is required to do one of the following:

  1. Add the business item to the agenda for the next AGM (but only if requested by the requisitionists); or
  2. Call and hold a meeting of owners within 35 days.

You should keep a copy of your letter/email and note the date and time that you sent it.

If your issue isn’t resolved after contacting your condo board or condo manager, proceed to #3 below.

3. Requisitionists can hold an owners’ meeting

If the board does neither a) or b) as indicated above, then the requisitionists themselves can call and hold the meeting. The meeting must be held within 45 days of being called.

To call the meeting, one of the requisitionists must send a notice of meeting to the owners at least 15 days before the day of the meeting. The notice must contain:

  • The location, date, and time of the meeting;
  • The business to be presented at the meeting;
  • A copy of the requisition; and
  • A copy of all proposed changes to the declaration, by-laws, and rules, or agreements to be discussed at the meeting (if the requisition is for one of these topics).

The materials required to be included in the notice of meeting are described in section 47 of the Condo Act. Owners are exempt from sending out the preliminary notice in this circumstance.

For more information on owner-requisitioned meetings, please click here.

Once you have reviewed this information, proceed to #4 below.

4. Follow up with the board in writing

After the meeting, you may want to contact your condo board (and condo manager, if your condo corporation has one) and provide them with the minutes of the meeting. This will ensure that they are well informed about any discussion or vote that took place at the meeting. Providing the condo corporation with the minutes will also ensure that the condo corporation is meeting their legal obligations to keep adequate records of all minutes from owners’ meetings.

If an owner incurs costs when calling the meeting, the owner can request reimbursement from the condominium corporation. The condo corporation is required to reimburse the requisitionist for all reasonable costs incurred in calling the meeting (e.g. costs for mailing the notice of meeting to all of the owners) under section 46 (6) of the Condo Act.

You should keep a copy of your letter/email and note the date and time that you sent it.

What if these steps don’t resolve my issue?

If you’ve tried the steps above and your issue still hasn’t been resolved, there are further steps you can take, including private mediation, arbitration, and other legal actions.

Visit Step #4 – Additional Help for more information.

Have a Question?

If you have a question about any of the information you’ve read, please contact us. We have a team available to answer any questions you may have.

Solutions for Owners

Helpful Resources

Owner to other Owners or Occupant Templates

First Letter to Owner
Second Letter to Owner
Third Letter to Owner

Owner to the Board of Directors Templates

First Letter to Condo Corp
Second Letter to Condo Corp

Board Directors to Owners Templates

First Letter to Owner