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Solutions for Condominium Boards & Managers

Meetings

1. Understand your rights and obligations

You can learn more about what the Condo Act says and the role your condo corporation’s governing documents by visiting Step #2 – Legal Considerations. Once you have reviewed this information, proceed to #2 below.

2. Address the behaviour with the owner

If you wish to address the behaviour during the meeting, you may want to address the situation by asking the owner causing the disruption to step out with the board member for a moment to discuss it. Your condo corporation’s by-laws may have provisions governing the conduct of owners and how it should be addressed.

Depending on the nature of the disturbance, it may need to be addressed immediately. Section 117 of the Condo Act prohibits anyone from allowing or causing any condition to exist, or carry on with any activity in a unit or in the common elements, that are likely to damage the property, or to injure someone. If the owner is behaving belligerently, you may want to ask the condo corporation’s security to step in (if the corporation has any), or call your local police department.

If you wish to address the behaviour after the meeting, you may want to address this situation the same way you would approach other potential violations of the governing documents. One approach that many condo corporations take is to send the owner a letter prepared by the condo corporation’s legal counsel.

Meetings may become quite heated, and if there are any threats of physical violence during or after the meetings, or the attendees express concerns about their personal safety, the corporation must take these matters seriously. In these circumstances it would be best to consult the corporation’s legal counsel to determine what measures should be taken.

What if these steps don’t resolve my issue?

If you’ve tried the steps above and your issue still hasn’t been resolved, there are further steps you can take, including private mediation, arbitration, or other legal actions.

Visit Step #4 – Additional Help for more information.

Have a Question?

If you have a question about any of the information you’ve read, please contact us. We have a team available to answer any questions you may have.
1. Understand your rights and obligations

You can learn more about what the Condo Act says, and the role your condo corporation’s governing documents by visiting Step #2 – Legal Considerations. Once you have reviewed this information, proceed to #2 below.

2. Respond to the requisition

After receiving a requisition, the board is required to do one of the following:

  1. Add the topics included in the requisition to the agenda for the next AGM, but only if requested by the requisitionists; or
  2. Call and hold a meeting of owners within 35 days.

If the requisitionists do not request the topics in the requisition to be included in the agenda of the next AGM, then the board must call and hold the meeting. Proceed to #3.

3. Requirements to call and hold an owner-requisitioned meeting

To hold an owner-requisitioned meeting, the board must send a preliminary notice to all unit owners at least 15 days before issuing a notice of meeting. Because the notice of meeting must be sent 15 days before the meeting, the preliminary notice must be sent within five days of receiving the requisition.

The materials required to be included in the preliminary notice are described in section 45.1 of the Condo Act.

The board must send a notice of meeting to the owners at least 15 days before the day of the meeting. The notice must contain and be accompanied by the following:

  • The location, date, and time of the meeting;
  • The business to be presented at the meeting;
  • A copy of the requisition; and
  • A copy of all proposed changes to the declaration, by-laws, rules, or agreements to be discussed at the meeting (if the requisition is for one of these topics).

The materials required to be included in the notice of meeting are described in section 47 of the Act.

For more information on owner-requisitioned meetings, click here.

What if these steps don’t resolve my issue?

If you’ve tried the steps above and your issue still hasn’t been resolved, there are further steps you can take, including private mediation, arbitration, or other legal actions.

Visit Step #4 – Additional Help for more information.

Have a Question?

If you have a question about any of the information you’ve read, please contact us. We have a team available to answer any questions you may have.
1. Understand your rights and obligations

You can learn more about what the Condo Act says, and the role your condo corporation’s governing documents by visiting Step #2 – Legal Considerations. Once you have reviewed this information, proceed to #2 below.

2. Quorum requirements for additional attempts to hold the AGM

For the AGM and the resulting decisions arising from the meeting to be considered valid, quorum must be achieved. Section 50 of the Condo Act provides the quorum requirements that need to be achieved in the different attempts to hold the meeting:

The standard quorum for an AGM is when owners who own 25% of the units in the condo corporation are present. If quorum is not reached on the first two attempts to hold the AGM, quorum is reduced to 15% on the third and on any subsequent attempts.

However, your condo corporation may have a by-law that requires quorum for the third attempt to be 25% instead of 15%.

3. Determine what to do next:

If you have attempted to hold the meeting and are unable to reach quorum in the 3 attempts outlined above, you may need to seek legal advice for further guidance.

What if these steps don’t resolve my issue?

If you’ve tried the steps above and your issue still hasn’t been resolved, there are further steps you can take, including private mediation, arbitration, or other legal actions.

Visit Step #4 – Additional Help for more information.

Have a Question?

If you have a question about any of the information you’ve read, please contact us. We have a team available to answer any questions you may have.

Solutions for Condominium Boards & Managers

Helpful Resources

Owner to other Owners or Occupant Templates

First Letter to Owner
Second Letter to Owner
Third Letter to Owner

Owner to the Board of Directors Templates

First Letter to Condo Corp
Second Letter to Condo Corp

Board Directors to Owners Templates

First Letter to Owner

Solutions for Condominium Boards & Managers