Voting by proxy

If you can’t attend meetings but still want to participate in decision-making processes, you can enable somebody who will attend the meeting to vote for you. You do this by completing a legal document called a proxy form. You then give the form to the attendee (the proxy). 

Proxies can serve for many types of votes. For instance, you can use a proxy to vote for a director.

The person you choose as your proxy need not be an owner in your condominium. You need to ensure that the person you choose as your proxy will represent your wishes at the meeting.

You can create only one proxy per unit. If you co-own your unit, the proxy represents all owners of the unit.

How a proxy is created

You must sign your written proxy form. Your signature on the proxy form must match the name on the condominium corporation’s record of owners.

You can use a proxy form to vote for the position on the board reserved for voting by owner-occupied units. Only owners of owner-occupied units can vote for that position, so your form must stipulate that it is a vote for that position.

Voting Method

Effective November 1, 2017, the following changes to voting method apply:

Votes may be cast by: 

(a) a show of hands, personally or by proxy

(b) a recorded vote that is:

(i) marked on a ballot cast personally or by a proxy

(ii) marked on an instrument appointing a proxy

(iii) indicated by telephonic or electronic means, if the by-laws so permit 

Also, condo owners now have the right to keep the content of their votes secret.  Under certain conditions, a condo corporation can pass a by-law to amend or repeal this right. For further details, please see section 14.1 of O. Reg. 48/01 under the Condominium Act, 1998.

Proxy form

Effective November 1, 2017, there is a mandatory proxy form available on the government’s website.

How a proxy is validated

At most meetings, your proxy must hand in the proxy form at a registration desk to allow them to vote on your behalf. Your condominium’s by-laws may specify how to deal with proxy forms at a meeting.

The condominium corporation must keep the proxy forms it receives for 90 days after the meeting.

Effective November 1, 2017, the record must be retained longer than the initial 90 days after the meeting if the corporation receives notice of litigation relating to the proxy within the 90 days.